Tuesday, August 7, 2012

The day I stabbed Orwell

The other day Tricky's EpiPen, that we were given at the hospital after his first anaphylaxis reaction, expired.

This is a brilliant thing for two reasons:
1 - If it expires it obviously means we didn't have to use it - HOORAY!

2 - I get to stab me an orange! BOOYAH!
I'm not scared of needles, I even had weekly injections for six months to desensitize myself to some allergens, but giving one to someone else is a little bit different to receiving them. There is nothing quite like stabbing fruit to get some pent up aggression out of the system practice, ya know? I decided to give him a name and a backstory because, well, it's me and I do stupid things like project feelings on to food.

I christened him Orwell the Orange. Orwell is allergic to Kiwi fruit and had been in the fruit bowl right next to one. If he'd had lips and eyes, they would have been swelling. I could have drawn them on but that would have been ridiculous, and only highly disturbed people would do that.

It became immediately obvious that the swelling was affecting Orwell's airway too, so I sprang in to action and grabbed the EpiPen, jammed it in his thigh and held it for the required 10 seconds.

That is one big bloody needle

I can only assume Orwell was so busy trying to not die that he didn't feel the giant needle going in, because he didn't even make a peep. Or a squelch. Or whatever noise it is that oranges make. Orwell is one tough cookie orange.

We can now all rest assured, safe in the knowledge that little Orwell is OK and that I'm confident to use a real EpiPen not just our training one.

Oh look, I'm disturbed after all
Are you needle phobic? Do you make oranges in to anthropomorphic test subjects?

29 comments:

  1. So glad you were there to save Orwell, he's one lucky dude! Wondering what the effects of eating adrenaline laced orange might be?

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  2. Kelley @ magnetoboldtooAugust 7, 2012 at 3:38 PM

    when Too was a baby we had, what we affectionately called 'the fit kit'


    cause she was prone to like, convulse, when her temp hit 38.5.


    Which was rather annoying.


    Fortunately we never had to use the fit kit - despite carrying it everywhere with us for 2 years - and when it expired I didn't get to play with it. Nor did I want to.


    Cause it was a suppository attached to a hose.

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  3. I'm the daughter of an anaesthetist so needles were a kind of normal part of my life growing up (if that makes sense). I had gestational diabetes so I had to prick myself with a needle 4 times a day for 3 months so its just as well needles don't bother me at all!

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  4. Hate needles, but don't have a phobia about them, like somebody that used to know. I have to look away when I'm giving blood.


    I've never had to give anyone a needle, but I guess you do what you have to do.


    I hope Orwell is OK.

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  5. i am not freaked out by needles but still don't like them. Glad I am not allergic to anything or diabetic.

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  6. good to hear orwell came to the rescue to help with your confidence :) x

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  7. I don't do needles well.
    Tattoo's? Piercings? I'm fine and dandy. Injections or blood drawers....yeah...nah. You've got no idea. It's quite ridiculous. My GP doesn't even push the issue with me because I punched him when I was five and frankly...I don't think he wants to risk it.

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  8. Whew, its lucky you have the skills to rescue an orange if it ever goes into anaphylaxis :)
    I had to give one of my friends her daily hormone injection for her ivf journey over a few cycles as her husband was deployed. Her belly (fortunately for her) felt pretty different to an orange! yay for not having to use it before its expiry!

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  9. You're a good friend! I'd secretly enjoy doing it, in a non-emergency situation I think. I kinda always wanted to be a phlebotomist

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  10. Dealing with children who punch is in Doctor101. I'm sure he moves the chairs further back every time you come in x

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  11. Tahlia, if you ever need help rescuing an Orange, I'm your gal!

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  12. I'd hate to have daily injections. Such a pain in the ass. Or tummy. Or wherever the needle goes.

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  13. I always look when I have a needle. Looked when I had Implanon put in my arm too - that was so cool :) S

    Orwell is sitting in the fruit bowl, away from the Kiwis :)

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  14. That would have been so annoying! I was sure I was going to get GD because all I could stomach for a lot of my pregnancy was chips and cake.

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  15. I shouldn't be laughing, should I? So glad you didn't have to use it, sticking a hose up a baby's bum is something no one should have to do.

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  16. I don't think eating it affects you? Not entirely sure though!

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  17. Love it! My old boss had an epi-pen and I was always nominating myself to stab him in the leg if he needed it.

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  18. I really don't mind needles, I practically grew up around them (at hospital, not like the were strewn around the floor of my crib or anything!)
    I'm glad you were able to save Orwell. Do you think your amazing, spinetingling super powers extend to saving peaches? Because I have this poor little one, Emil as she calls herself, who is allergic to being eaten and I'm going out of my mind with worry!

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  19. Haha Abby, how'd he feel about your eagerness to stab him?

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  20. OH NOES! Poor Emil. Sadly, I don't think any amount of adrenaline could help young Emil. Palliative care (which for peaches consists of being simmered in sugar and water) is the only thing I can suggest.

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  21. It definitely unnerved him...I loved reminding him too ;)

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  22. I am petrified of needles.... Of the medical kind. Veins always collapse when they try to take blood and then I end up looking like the biggest junkie out there, and to get a flu jab or anything like that I have to sit there for a good 20mins while I try not to freak out before the doc can jab me.
    Yet when it comes to peircings I'm totally fine. Makes no sense! Haha

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  23. Thank you for the advice, Emil should be in her sugery bath shortly. Hopefully, she'll make a full recovery!

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  24. My advice is to watch the Annoying Orange on You Tube then repeat the experiment. I'm sure you'll have no problem with jabbing an anthropomorphic orange after that.

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  25. Such a good idea. The kickback on the actual EpiPen can't be replicated with the demo. I keep all my expired pens for teachers/carers etc, so that they really understand that the pen has a bit of thrust and to know to hold it firmly and not be suprised. I also tell them to hold my kid down, lean on them if they need to, to make sure the needle stays in. In the hospital reaction, an experienced nurse lost the needle when my son bucked when he felt the needle. If that happened in real life, we would have lost the medicine. The expired epi trial drives this point home. I tell them that I'd rather they break his ribs by holding him still than risk his life.

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  26. Ugh, that's awful :( A good phlebotomist who can hit a vein every time, no matter who the patient is, is worth their weight in gold.

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  27. Wise words, Jilly. Map Guy and I were talking about how we'd probably have to lay across Tricky to pin him down for it so the needle would stay in long enough. I'd much rather broken ribs than death!

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